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Happy Father’s Day and Welcome to Summer!

June 21, 2009
Fresh-picked, Homegrown Strawberries

Gorgeous right? You will start to notice a lighter shade of berry on the stand in the coming weeks. Our late variety, Idea, is one of our biggest, juiciest, and sweetest, but red it is not. Don't be afraid to give them a shot, you'll be surprised by this big orange book.

No way around it, it has been a tough week to get much accomplished down on the farm. We were blessed with those few sunny days earlier in the week that allowed us to finish getting our late tomatoes in the ground and our early ones finally staked and pruned and caged. It was also temperate enough to do some much needed rainwater management, both before and after the storm. We have been able to redirect some of the overflow from the greenhouse rainwater retention tank from further destroying our road and field. Additionally, in the pouring rain, we planted a future lettuce crop on some nice raised beds toward the back of the home field, only  to chop through them to get the water to drain beyond them out of the field when we got the Thursday night downpours.

You may not have noticed around all the rain, drizzle and fog, but we have been able to pick some really wonderful produce this week. The strawberries have held up despite the weather, and the peas have been coming in steady. Those sugar snaps are still not ripe.

We will have these very sweet Greater Progress for a little while more and begin picking Strike in a few days. It is similar in size to the Spring Pea we had earlier, but a darker green.

We will have these very sweet Greater Progress for a little while more and begin picking Strike in a few days. They will be similar in size to the Spring Pea we had earlier, but a darker green.

We don’t know what to tell you, other than we are pretty disappointed in the timing of this new variety; our fingers our crossed Sugar Ann will be available again to us next year. In the meantime we may have some sort of homegrown pea well into July at this rate.

The first lettuce crop has been pretty well sold out; what an awesome one it was too. We hope you guys remember how beautiful and huge those lettuce heads were when the inevitable crop of tiny ones comes in at some point later in the summer. We will have homegrown Boston at least for a few more days and hopefully some of the more interesting early varieties in the next crop will plump out by next weekend.

The early root crops are a huge bonus for the week. The beets are gaining size every day, and hopefully flavor to match, and since Friday we have been pulling homegrown carrots as well. They are on the young side but very sweet. In this crop we have our standard orange variety, Six-Shooter, and also some of those wonderful Yellowstone.  SixShooter and Yellowstone carrots will sweeten your day.

Red Ace and Big Top Beets, perfect for a fresh salad or roasted on the grill.

Red Ace and Big Top Beets, perfect for a fresh salad or roasted on the grill.

Plus, to prove it is really truly summer, all that squash is starting to pour in. From nearly nothing on Wednesday, we are already bringing in bushels a day now of zucchini, yellow summer, eight ball and cousa squashes. You know that means zucchini bread, fritter, and other use-it-up recipes are in your future!

We have a new variety of scallions we are trying this year, very slender and fine so far, we will have to see where they go, but they have a very nice sweet/tangy balance.Scallions-Ishikura Improved

That is the field update for now, but I will be sure to update you midweek if we get to work on anything exciting and less damp.

Clockwise from top-left: Spineless Beauty Zucchini, Gold Rush Yellow Zucchini, Fortune Yellow, Eight Ball, and Clarita Cousa make up the bulk of our first crop of Summer Squash offerings.

Clockwise from top-left: Spineless Beauty Zucchini, Gold Rush Yellow Zucchini, Fortune Yellow, Eight Ball, and Clarita Cousa make up the bulk of our first crop of Summer Squash offerings.

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